Archive for July, 2009

Freight, Low Ball Pricing

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009

I recently was asked by freight forwarding company to quote 4 round trip flatbed shipments bound for international shipping. They asked me to give them a low ball quote and they would award me these shipments. I told them that this was impossible for me to do. I told them that “we were not in business to maintain their profit margins. We are in business to also to make profit.” We are not in business to keep the tires rolling. Just like them we need to make a profit for payroll and other miscellaneous expenses. We have P&L to account for; I would rather pass on an opportunity to take a loss.

I know times are hard for everybody, but we all have to watch out for our bottom lines.

Freight, Timely written claims

Tuesday, July 28th, 2009

Timely Written Claims
The claimant is required to file a written freight claim with the trucking company within nine months of the date of delivery of the property, if no delivery was made, then nine months after reasonable time for delivery has pasted. Claims, reasonable delivery and timely deliveries are defined under Title 49, section 370.3 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This regulation defines a claim as a written notification filed with the proper trucking company within the time limits specified on the bills of lading. It should contain all the facts sufficiently to identify the shipment, property lost and assertion of liability.
When a proper claim is received the trucking company has obligations and timetables are set in the Code of Federal Regulations.
1. The trucking company must acknowledge the claim within 30 days
2. They have To create a separate file and assign a successive claim number and add it to all documentation filed to support the claim.
3. The trucking company is then required to pay, decline and or make a settlement offer within 120 days after they have received the claim.
4. If the trucking company cannot make a compromise within 120 days, each 60 days thereafter, the claimant must be advised in writing.

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Freight, Reasonable Delivery

Monday, July 27th, 2009

A trucking company has the right to deliver the freight in a reasonable period of time. The driver of the truck must act in the best interest of the public. He must drive safe, obey the speed limit, follow the hours of service regulations, and follow local laws while making every reasonable effort to deliver your freight on time, or as soon as possible. If the Driver delivers late, you cannot legally deduct delay charges from the freight bill. Let’s assume you and your provider both agreed to your “Foreseeable Damages” description in writing. In the event of a missed appointment, you legally must pay the original freight bill in full, and then file a formal claim to recover your delay charges. Your claim must include receipts and other supporting evidence of your damages and costs. Wise shipping companies greatly reduce their risk by obeying the law and following this process to recover damages.

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Something to look out for…

Friday, July 24th, 2009

There is an EPIDEMIC in the Transportation World right now, today – 2008. YOUR freight is being illegally double brokered by your Carriers to other Carriers without your knowledge or permission. When this happens – YOUR freight is no longer insured!!!

True story: A few months ago, a carrier brokered a load of pipe to a friend who had a trucking company. There was no paperwork exchanged. While transporting the pipe, the driver took a corner too fast, and rolled the trailer and all of the product down a steep mountainside.

The problem: THE SECOND CARRIER WAS UNINSURED. He had no cargo insurance and no liability insurance.

The result: The Shipper was left with the problem of suing the first carrier for the value of his pipe. The first carrier simply filed bankruptcy and started a new company one month later under a new MC# (learn why MC#s give you instant critical info).
The Shipping Manager was screwed, and he was fired for using the first carrier.

What could the Shipper have done to avoid this expensive loss? They could have qualified the trucking company to a service and performance “standard”. This is not a guarantee that they would not have had the same problem. But odds are they would have avoided the problem. (learn more about setting your own “standard”)

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Foreseeable Damages

Friday, July 24th, 2009

If the Shipping company gives notice to ALL parties (the broker and/or the carrier) that if the load misses its appointment time that there will be penalties assessed of $____ per day or $____ hour UP FRONT (notice of “foreseeable damages”) prior to the truck even being dispatched, and ALL parties agree to these terms, then the Shipper can collect for delay charges. This notice must be in writing, and should require signatures. This falls under the “just in time” concept that the auto manufacturers use, and they pay a Premium for this guaranteed service. If you negotiate something like this with your transportation services provider, expect to pay a premium for this type of service. Use a freight services company that is large and financially stable enough to execute this high level service. If you use a smaller provider who has their truck break down, they may not have the ability to fix the truck fast enough to make the appointment, and they may not have the resources to pay for all the penalties from the delay. At best, your freight could sit for hours or days while you try to find another provider to move the load. Use a large, stable provider with the financial ability to support a broken down truck quickly – or any other type of delay that could cost YOU money.

Source Freight tec

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Short well based vehicles

Friday, July 24th, 2009

When you have a vehicle that you need to load on step deck but do not have loading dock or ramps you still have two options.

1. The vehicle must have a short wheel base for this to work. You can use a rollback wrecker to load the vehicle on the step deck trailer.

2. The second option is not recommended, but still an option. You have to have a trucker willing to back his trailer into a shallow ditch. Then you use 2 x 4 and 4 x 4 to build a ramp. Then you can drive the vehicle on the trailer.

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Moving Containers

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009

Here is some information on shipping containers. Before booking a container with a shipper or trucking you will need some very important information.

1. Before booking a container with a shipper you should ask if it will be 20 footers or 40 footers. Also ask if it is a standard or high cube container. You will need to know what is inside the container. Such as lumber, steel or general merchandise. It is important to note that you should ask if it is hazardous or house hold goods. Not all carriers can haul house hold goods. Also ask the value of the container. (I once moved a container for a customer and I failed to ask and he failed to let me know the value. It was valued over 2 million dollars, luckily nothing happened.)

2. Before booking a container with a trucker you should ask if he is TWIC certified and if his trailer has container locks.

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Superload TX to AL

Monday, July 20th, 2009

More thoughts on super load movements throughout the United States, not every movement can be hauled by truck. You may have to explore other options in these movements. Recently I was asked to quote a super load from Texas to Alabama at the width of 23 feet. Alabama will not issue a super load for width past 18 feet. They will allow for short haul movements.

I will now have to explore my other options. At this point we have two options by rail or by barge. I will have to determine which will be more cost effective and the shortest transit time. As soon as I get this determined I will post with the results.

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Superloads

Monday, July 20th, 2009

Before quoting super loads there a few things to keep in mind and also remind your customer that it will take a few days to a week to quote. Here are a few factors to keep in mind.

1. Each state varies in their super load requirements. For instance, if it is a super load in Missouri it may not be a super load in Texas.

2. To obtain a super load permit it will vary from state to state, but usually it will take 8 to 12 weeks to get a permit.

3. All super loads will go into bridges or engineering for each state. In bridges/engineering they will evaluate the best possible route for the load to travel.

4. Once approved you will have a permit.

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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Alabama Certified

Friday, July 17th, 2009

Alabama is now requiring that the driver be certified to carry coils. IF THE DRIVER DOES NOT HAVE THIS CERTIFICATION HE WILL BE FINED AND SO WILL THE BROKER. Make sure that you have a copy of this certification before sending the confirmation. If driver that loads the coil is certified, but he hands off the load to another driver the broker is not liable. Make sure that they have coil racks, if not most of the time they can purchase them at a truck stop, and be Alabama Certified. More states in the future will be adopting this requirement.

for more information on freight moving, contact Jose at
jose@momentumtransport.com

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