Archive for December, 2010

New Wingfoot Trucking Company Care Centers

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

Transport drivers out on the roads and highways of the United States providing shipping container services for customers will be interested in the news that Wingfoot Commercial Tire recently announced the opening of the 34th and 35th Wingfoot Truck Care Centers. Wingfoot Commercial Tire has been providing services for transport firms and drivers in America for years and this news will certainly make heavy haul firms and drivers that have benefited from Wingfoot Commercial Tire services before smile.

Wingfoot Commercial Tire’s 34th and 35th Truck Care Centers are located in Russellville, Arkansas and Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The Russelville center is located at 185 Interstate Road on Interstate 40, exit 184, adjacent to the Flying J facility, the Tuscaloosa truck maintenance center is located at 4400 Skyland Boulevard East on Interstate 20/59, exit 76, on the Pilot Travel Center property. Both centers provide heavy hauling trucking firms and drivers with preventative maintenance service, including oil changes, and light mechanical service, like brake, electrical, and heating/air conditioning repairs. In addition, transport firms and drivers can find new tires and retreads on site, and roadside assistance is available for customers requiring this service.

Transport drivers that want to check out these two new locations should talk to another driver about Wingfoot Truck Care Centers and the services provided. This could help you make sure customers cargo is delivered on time and budget, should you happen to need a little help while out on the roads and highways of the United States.

Freight Shipping Heavier Loads in Maine

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Freight trucking firms and drivers planning on conducting transportation services on the roads and highways of Maine in the future will be interested in the news that the latest Senate bill contains a provision to extend the current one-year pilot project allowing heavier transport trucks to operate on the Interstate highways of Maine. The current pilot project is going to expire and allows transport trucks over 100,000 pounds to operate on Interstate highways, like Interstate 95, 295 and 395, in Maine, according to sources in the transport industry of the United States of America.

Sources in Maine indicate that the members of the Appropriations Committee were recently convinced to put their support behind the idea of extending the current program that allows transport trucks operating on some Interstate highways in Maine to exceed the 80,000-pound federal transport truck weight limit. They also indicate that there could be some facts and belief that the year-long pilot program was actually successful in reducing the costs of transportation in Maine for trucking companies and putting more Americans to work.

This news has garnered some applause from sectors of the transportation services industry of the United States of America and a few frowns from other people concerned about heavier transport trucks operating on the roads and highways of America and Maine during the months and years ahead. This news is a victory to some people in Maine and America and others view this as something that needs to be looked at closer, either way it appears heavier transport trucks could be traveling on the Interstate highways of Maine for another year.

Long Haul Truck Tires

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

Transport fleets that need to make sure in-house flatbed truck tire technicians are up to date with the latest techniques being implemented by transport firms to help keep customers cargo moving to destination in a reliable, efficient and cost effective manner will be interested in a recent announcement by the Tire Industry Association. The Tire Industry Association has announced the 2011 dates for the Automotive Tire Service (ATS) and Commercial Tire Service (CTS) Certified Instructor programs.

The newly revised ATS program combines classroom instruction, with comprehensive hands-on education, according to the Tire Industry Association, and provides students completing the program with the skills they need to return to their companies and impart the things they have learned to other shipping transport workers by conducting in-house Certified ATS Technician or Instructor classes.

The CTS program makes use of classroom instruction, combined with hands-on learning, and meets the current standards required by OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.177, according to the Tire Industry Association. Students completing the CTS Instructor program are qualified to certify technicians in the field once they return to their trucking company.

Transport firms that want to check out the 2011 dates for the Automotive Tire Service and Commercial Tire Service Certified Instructor programs should visit the Tire Industry Association website for more information. You want to make sure you sign up as soon as possible, so that you can keep up to date, and make sure your truck tire technicians have the latest information available.

Port Trucking Services Study

Monday, December 13th, 2010

Independent shipping container haulers interviewed during a study conducted by the National Employment Law Project will be interested in the news that the experts looking at the results of this study believe they indicate that independent container haulers are essentially misclassified employees. The study in question interviews about 2,000 drivers at seven of the major ports of the United States and indicates that independent drayage drivers work up to 60 hours per week for wages many consider to be at the poverty level, according the experts. In addition, the people analysing the study believe that the independent container haulers in this study lack the autonomy that’s the hallmark of an independent transport driver under federal law.

According to the National Employment Law Project the results of this study indicate that heavy haul firms in this case determine when, where, how and in what time frame drivers work. They also determine when truck inspections and drug tests are conducted and have very detailed and tight requirements under which drivers conduct business. Driver behavior is looked at constantly, evaluated and correcting measures are implemented if the companies believes some are needed. All of these facts make the port trucking industry vulnerable to misclassification, according to the people looking at this latest study.

This news might not surprise many drivers in the business of international shipping operating in the seven ports in question, or many transport firms doing business in a port in America? Hopefully, during the miles ahead something can be done to help these truck drivers take care of these problems, according to many people looking at this news.

Intermodel Shipping With Natural Refrigerant

Friday, December 10th, 2010

Transport drivers and transportation services using a container refrigeration system incorporating conventional synthetic hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants, which according to transportation industry sources have a greater potential for increasing the carbon wheel-print of the transport trucks of the United States of America, will be happy to hear that a system using natural refrigerant for intermodal containers is now available. This news is going to help transportation firms around the United States of America and the world find sustainable solutions for refrigerated transport, according to trucking company experts, and represents the world’s first natural refrigerant technology for container refrigeration.

Transport experts indicate that this new container refrigeration system incorporates carbon dioxide instead of conventional synthetic hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants, which according to the scientists could reduce the volume of emissions being put into the air. Called NaturaLINE, this new natural refrigerant technology was on display at Intermodal Europe 2010, recently, and according to the people on hand to take a look at this new container refrigeration system, this could be just the thing to help freight shipping firms save money and reduce the carbon wheel-print of the transport services they provide to Americans on a daily basis during the months and years ahead. Great news for American transport firms in the business of making sure customers cargo makes it to destination on time and budget, and something that could make the job of making the trucks on the highways and roads of the United States of America more environmentally-friendly easier as we head into the second decade of the century of the environment.

Shipping on Properly Inflated Tires

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010

The freight forwarders in the office will appreciate the amount of time and effort that transport drivers and firms spend in trying to make sure truck tires are properly inflated. Hendrickson Trailer Suspension Systems recently announced that Tiremaxx Pro, an automated inflation system that allows for precise maintenance of trailer tires, will soon be ready to be used by transport firms in the business of providing a great freight quote to use in the business of transporting freight to destination in a reliable, efficient and cost-effective manner during the months and years ahead. According to the people over at Hendrickson Trailer Suspension Systems Tiremaxx Pro is the first automated tire inflation system capable of active tire deflation and balancing, and will be ready to be implemented by transport firms sometime in the first quarter of 2011.

A patented system that features straightforward mechanical design and engineering, Tiremaxx Pro uses no electronics, transducers, or pressure switches, and continuously monitors truck tire pressure to respond to changes in environmental temperatures, according to the people over at Hendrickson Trailer Suspension Systems. The system draws air from the trailer air supply in order to keep truck tires properly inflated, and if the environmental temperature increases, the system will act in order to keep flatbed trucking tires inflated to the proper pressure. This helps to improve the tread life of truck tires, according to the engineers over at Hendrickson Trailer Suspension Systems, especially for transport vehicles sporting wide-base single truck tires that are more sensitive to being improperly inflated.

Natural Gas Powered Heavy Equipment Transport

Monday, December 6th, 2010

Transport firms in the freight forwarding business using natural gas powered engines in some of the transport vehicles they use to transport customers cargo to destination on time and budget can now get the oil they need to keep natural gas powered engines operating in different container sizes. Valvoline Premium Blue GEO 15W-40 has been available for transport firms to use for a while, but recently Valvoline announced Premium Blue GEO 15W-40 is now available in a 1-gallon jug that will be handy and useful for transport firms in the business of providing a great freight quote using naturally gas powered engines to have around when they need one.

Valvoline has indicated that Premium Blue GEO 15W-40 is endorsed and recommended by Cummins as a CES 20074 approved engine oil for Cummins trucks using naturally gas powered engines. Premium Blue GEO 15W-40 also comes in a variety of different containers, including bulk, totes, drums, pails and now a 1-gallon jug, according to Valvoline, and is recommended for use in Cummins B, C & ISL, Detroit Diesel, John Deere and Caterpillar dedicated natural gas engines used by flatbed trucking firms around the United States.

Valvoline has also indicated that Premium Blue GEO 15W-40 has advantages for transport firms that includes reduced ash content, value recession protection, advanced oxidation control, low oil consumption, piston deposit control, excellent shear stability, and enhanced valve train wear protection. Great news for all transport drivers and firms taking cargo to destination on the roads and highways of America during the miles ahead.

Medium-Duty Trucking Units Could Save You Money

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

Medium-duty transports could be a way for a trucking company operating in the United States of America to reduce the gas mileage of the transportation vehicles they use to move customers cargo to destination in a reliable, efficient and cost-effective manner during the miles ahead, according to a recent survey conducted by J.D. Power and Associates. The survey in question was recently released by J.D. Power and Associates and according to the interpretation of the results could indicate that firms using certain medium-duty trucks for shipping customers cargo to destination could save as much as $2,000 per medium-duty transport vehicle per year. Significant news, if the results of the survey have been interpreted correctly, that will definitely get the attention of transport firms that are presently using medium-duty transport trucks to help deliver customers cargo on time and budget during the last few months and years.

The survey indicates that some medium-duty transport trucks cost about 18 percent less to operate on a yearly basis as compared to other medium-duty trucks, according to the people over at J.D. Power and Associates. This means that freight hauling firms implementing medium-duty transport trucks in their fleet operations might want to compare the results of the survey to the medium-duty trucks they’re currently using. It could be another way to save money on fuel during the weeks and months ahead and increase the fuel mileage of the medium-duty transport trucks they use on a daily basis to keep customers cargo moving along the roads and highways of the United States of America.

Transport companies and drivers that want to check out the survey and results should contact J.D. Power and Associates to see where they can get a look at the survey. It could be just the thing to improve them save money on fuel and find a more efficient medium-duty transport to help them in the future.